The TV Trap

I love having my kids outside helping me with projects but sometimes I fall into the TV trap.When the capricious weather is pouring rain or it is -20 outside I put in a movie while I work in the cold.

Right now the weather is still warm enough that the kids are outside with me while we put the goats out and feed horses. We have also been spending time playing on the swing set with Penelope and Fiona who both love to swing. Being outside is good for the kids but when it is extremely cold outside they can only handle it for a few minutes. In the middle of winter I usually only get 1/3 of the way through morning chores when their fingers get too cold for them to be outside. That is when I usually start to fall into the TV trap. It is easier for me to set up a movie for them rather than bundling them up to go outside then having to bring them back in 15 minutes later while I head back out. They watch a movie while I work but the more TV they watch the more they want to watch. It is a slippery slope situation.

black crt tv

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Fiona can be a little TV bug and I have even caught Penelope watching the TV when it is on. It bothers me when the baby starts watching TV and when Fiona gets upset when TV time is over. That is when I know she is watching too much. I have realized we have slipped down the slippery slope.(It has been an extremely wet fall here is Wisconsin.) I know when the weather is very cold it is better for them to stay inside so I have been working on limiting their screen time to only while I am outside and the weather is bad.

Soon it we will be the middle of winter when the thermometer can’t be bribed into climbing above zero. Being housebound during below zero weather is hard for them, and me, so I try to have a few activities for them.

Housebound Activities:

  • Reading Time: Even if your children can’t read yet (mine aren’t reading yet) they are associating the words on the page with the story the pictures tell. They also learn how to quietly work on an activity.
  • Drawing Time: Having paper and color crayons/pencils/markers around in the winter or during rainy weather is a must. Children work on fine motor skills such as holding a writing utensil properly and to associate it with making a pretty picture to show you. Fiona has been banned from markers because she just can’t help coloring on herself.
  • Play Dough- Using play dough is great for tactile engagement and lets them build something with their hands. Play dough is also a sensory tool to help children develop fine motor skills in different ways. They discover how to move their hands in order to manipulate the play dough how they want it.
  • Do the Dishes- This may sound like manual labor but your kids get to play in water with soapy bubbles. Not only are they going to get wet they are going to have a blast and you may get a few dishes done. Maybe…
  • Get Physical- After a few quite activities it would be a good idea to do some stretches, jumping jacks, or run in place. Something to work off the built up energy that needs an outlet.
  • Free Play- If you have the space a playroom is great for inside days because it gives the kids their own space to play as they wish. Place their toys in the room with designated bins to help with cleanup later because after a day inside the room will look as if a tornado hit. Make sure cleanup time is part of the routine because kids need to learn how to clean-up their own toys.
  • Make a Fort- Use a few light blanket and chairs to make a fort. Reading and coloring is soooo much more exciting when it is done inside a blanket fort. I would leave the playdough as a tabletop activity.
  • Games- Break out any age appropriate board games and card games to play and interact with your kids. A few of our personal favorites are Candy Land and Old Maid.
chocolate biscuits beside chocolate coffee

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Even when it is below freezing outside it can still be nice to let the kids out for a breath of freezingly fresh air. Bundle up and walk around the yard for 10 minutes. I know it takes longer than that to get bundled and unbundled but going out for a breather will be invigorating for you and the kids. I have an outdoor wood-stove that needs to be checked at least once in the afternoon so in the winter I bundle the kids up and we fill the wood-stove. They play in the snow a little before we all go in and have hot chocolate.

Sitting at the table with my kids drinking hot chocolate after we have played outside is one of the best parts of winter. It is also good socializing spent away from the TV!

 

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Happy Halloween

candle creepy dark decoration

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Fall is a great time of year filled with lovely warm colors, apples, pumpkins, and ghosts. October is ending and it is time to celebrate the harvest and say goodbye to fall. Winter is coming.

The end of the harvest traditionally was celebrated with bonfires and feasts but in our corner we celebrate it with trips to the pumpkin patch, costumes, and candy.

I am close to my sisters and we like to get our families together to celebrate holidays, birthdays, and whatever else pops up. Last week we celebrated my niece Lily’s birthday by going to the Burch Barn, which is a local pumpkin patch that has a long list of activities for the kids. We played in the giant shelled corn pit, flew down the huge slide on burlap bags, raced pedal tractors, and bounced in pumpkin and barn shaped bouncy houses.  I love taking the kids to the Burch Barn because at $5.00 a person it is the most affordable fall attraction for kids around. Each year they improve the attractions or add one. The only event that costs extra is to ride the “Grain Train” which are carts pulled by a tractor through the woods. The kids love this part because they get pulled by a tractor and there is a scavenger hunt to find items during the ride. They have to keep their eyes peeled for a buck, turkeys, a coyote, and a cheesehead among other items.

kimg0515I also love the fact that there are tables and chairs in the barns which make for great eating areas out of the wind. There are hot dogs to purchase for lunches but we usually make our own sandwiches to bring. This is a big draw for us because it is more affordable to bring our own picnic lunch. I didn’t have any trouble laying kids down for naps afterwards even Lucian, who is 5, passed out for about an hour and a half.

This year for Halloween we are going to have our own little troop of loggers. Not only is my father a dairy farmer, he is also a woodsman and my son looks up to his Papa. This year he wanted to be a logger and whatever Lucian is doing Fiona wants to do as well. That makes two little loggers and if there are two we might as well dress Penelope in flannel and make it three.kimg0529

We could go Trick-or-Treating in town but it is always very busy and our children are little. They only need a small amount of candy otherwise we eat Halloween candy all year. Fiona is also a bit of a runner and requires hand holding at all times so walking around town on a busy, busy night makes me nervous.

Our Trick-or-Treating rounds consist of auntie’s, grandma’s, and great grandma’s houses. This makes for long stretches in the car and short bouts of visiting but the family loves to see the costumes and to celebrate our traditions of the turning season.

 

Pumpkin Time

The apples have been sauced and now it is time for pumpkins.

Trenton hurt his back last week, right before cold weather set in so the kids and I worked really hard to get the last of the garden harvested before the frost hit. It started snowing and blowing right away in the morning so we bundled up to get morning chores done and pick the pumpkins. I started doing chores while I sent Lucian to find his red wagon to put the pumpkins in. kimg0464

This may be a little parental bragging but that son of mine can get a job done once he sets his mind to it. I was struggling to move the round bale feeder, which is a big metal ring with head slots to keep the horses from walking on their hay and wasting it, when I noticed the kids in the garden loading their wagon with little pie pumpkins. Fiona and Lucian were having a great time hunting for the bright orange pumpkins and didn’t need my help at all. I told them where to put the pumpkins in the garage and they went about their business.

Letting them complete that chore on their own gave them an accomplishment to be proud of. They were able to see a job well done and I was proud of them because they knew their dad was hurt and they wanted to help.

Now that the pumpkins are picked it is time to cook them down. In previous years I would scoop out the seeds, cut the peel off the meat of the pumpkin, and cook it down in a crock-pot. Last year I decided to halve the pumpkins, scoop out the seeds, and cook them in the oven like I do squash. It was soooo much easier.

After the pumpkin is soft I scoop it out and freeze it. Most pumpkin recipes call for two cups so it is easier to measure the cooked pumpkin into bags. Then it is already measured and all I have to do is thaw and add it to the recipe.kimg0439-1

One of the benefits to having animals is that hardly anything goes to waste. I give the pumpkin seeds and pulp to my goats because it works as a natural dewormer and I give the cooked skins to the chickens. Jack, our horse, has even nibbled pumpkin rind on occasion.

I love cooking with pumpkin because it is versatile and wholesome. There are not many vegetables that can taste good in a cookie and a soup.

My favorite pumpkin recipe is an easy pumpkin bread from Betty Crocker:

  • 4 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup butter, softened
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 can (15 oz) pumpkin or 2 cups homegrown pumpkin
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons miniature semisweet chocolate chips
  • 2 tablespoons chopped pecans
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease the bottoms of two 8×4-inch loaf pans.

Here is where I improvise. I don’t like to do dishes so if I can complete a recipe in one bowl I will do so.

2. In a large bowl beat 2 cups of sugar and butter. Add the eggs one or two at a time beating well. Beat in water and pumpkin. Add flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Stir well until moistened add chocolate chips. Spread evenly in pans. Sprinkle tops with chocolate chips, pecans, and sugar. (I always forget the topping, but it tastes great without it.)

3. Bake 1 hour and 5-15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pans for 10 minutes; remove to cooling rack.

The recipe is easy and tastes delicious. It also works well if it is halved and muffin tins can be used instead of a bread pan.

How do you like to use your pumpkins?

Don’t forget to save a few to make Jack-o-Lanterns! Lucian and Fiona are excited to make Pumpkin Moonshines like little Sylvie Ann in Pumpkin Moonshine which is one of their favorite books from their Aunty Jessica.

Apples

Fall is a busy time of year for collecting and processing the wonderful fruits and vegetables we have grown through the summer. While we still have not put in our own orchard I know a few people who have apples aplenty.

This last Sunday I took the kids apple picking with Grandma Linda and we all had a great time. Lucian was up in the branches hollering, “Look how beautiful this one is!” “See how red it is?” “Smell it, it smells delicious.” Fiona’s job was to grab apples from Lucian and put them into the basket. Every once in a while I would pick her up so she could yank one off the tree. Her continuous question was, “Can I eat this?” The girl loves apples. I haven’t climbed a tree in a few years but I was up in one of the other trees picking as many as I could reach. All the good ones were up top. Penelope was content to watch us pick apples, most of the time, then she was happy with grandma snuggles. When we finished we had lunch at Alley Cats which is one of the local coffee shops conveniently located just down the alley from where we were picking apples.

kimg0457I have had a giant basket of apples riding around in my car for a few days and have finally gotten around to processing them. Why in the car? You might ask. Trenton asked the same thing. It is cooler outside than in the house, they all won’t fit in the refrigerator, I don’t want them to get mushy from being too warm and they are protected if it freezes. Trunks are for temporarily storing apples in, aren’t they?

I peeled about a third of the apples yesterday which filled my big crock-pot. That was also as many apples as I could peel without my hand cramping up painfully. We have an apple peeler/corer but on most real apples it doesn’t work very well. I stress real apples because most apples that are not from big orchards are a little wonky. They are not the perfectly round apples you expect to see in the store. Sometimes the core is off center and they can be a bit lumpy but the flavor is amazing.

One full crock-pot of sliced apples and 1/2 cup of water set on low for about 5 hours turns into 4 pints of great looking applesauce. I think we have enough apples for one more batch of applesauce and a batch of apple butter. I’m hoping I can find the recipe for apple butter that I used last year because it was delicious. If I remember correctly I found an apple butter recipe that didn’t add sugar to the mix. I like to find recipes that taste great without adding extra sugar.

Lucian and Fiona both love the apple butter. I’ll have them help mix in the spices when it is time to make it. They both love to cook so it will be fun for them to help make it and help eat it when it is finished.

Firewood

The smell of fall is in the air. Nights are getting cooler, leaves are turning colors, and the buzz of chainsaws fill my ears. It must be time to start cutting firewood and Lucian is super excited.

I like heating our house with wood because:

chainsaw equipment machine tool

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  • Wood is a renewable resource.
  • The house stays warmer.
  • It is less expensive than propane or natural gas.
  • I have to go outside.
  • You are heated twice with wood heat. Once while you cut, split, and haul it and twice when you burn the wood.

I prefer wood heat to other heat sources but there are a few disadvantages to using wood heat.

  • I have to go outside.
  • I have to cut, split, haul, and stack the wood.

You will notice that I have these items on both of my lists. We have an outdoor wood boiler which is a stove that heats water outside then pumps it into the house. The house is heated by the hot water and it is insurable because the wood stove is not inside the house. Insurance companies hate wood stoves inside your house, unfortunately. I both like and dislike having to go outside. It depends on the weather, fussiness of the kids, and if I just want to go to sleep rather than bundling up to fill the fire before bed. If it has been sleeting and is icy I try to convince Trenton to fill the wood stove before he goes to bed but usually we take turns.

Also there are days where I enjoy the process of cutting, splitting, hauling, and stacking firewood but there are other days where I want the job to complete itself. If it is sunny, cool and the kids are cooperative I enjoy being outside working but if it’s hot, cold or if the kids are fussy butts I just don’t feel like doing firewood that day. I guess it depends on the mood of the weather, the kids, and me.

Overall I enjoy using firewood for heat and we have already started working on our pile for the winter. I have a few blisters to show for it too. Last year I was pregnant with Penelope so Trenton did most of the work himself but I’m ready to help this year. Trenton cut a few logs for the kids and I to work on splitting and stacking during the week. After Lucian is done with school we go out there and work on it and Fiona, who is 2, likes to help load the wagon with smaller pieces of wood.

This may be a bit weird but working on firewood is Lucian’s favorite thing to do. He asks to work on firewood before and after school. He is planning to use his four wheeler to haul firewood and Trenton obligingly welded a hitch to it so he can pull the wagon. Fiona likes to help too but she does not have his enthusiasm for the work. She likes horses and wants to ride them all the time. Thank goodness our horse, Jack, is great with kids.

We have also had our first firewood related accident for the year. Lucian was putting tools away and dropped a splitting wedge on his toe. A splitting wedge is a heavy triangular shaped piece of metal used to pound into big, stubborn pieces of wood to split them. It warranted a trip to the ER but he did not need stitches and the toe is not broken. He did have to wear a medical boot for about a week so he did not bump his little toe on anything. Lucian was a bit animated about it because it was just like the one Grandma Linda is wearing. He will, hopefully, remember forever now that he has to have real shoes on when he is out working with wood. We have invested in a nice pair of workbooks for his little feet.

Pig Roast

Each of our children have been baptized  the summer after they were born. After the church service we have a big lunch with family and friends outside in the yard. For Penelope’s baptismal lunch we decided to raise a pig for a pig roast. Neither Trenton or I have ever roasted or butchered a pig ourselves so it was an experience.

dirty animal farm farmer

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We have been attempting to be a little more self-sufficient and a large part of that is raising and processing our own food. In the garden it is growing, pickling, and freezing vegetables. With the animals it means collecting eggs and deciding when an animal is ready to be harvested. The pigs are ready to be harvested.

The shear amount of time that goes into the process of roasting a pig is amazing. If the pork wasn’t so delicious we would  never roast another pig.

Initial steps before roasting:

  1. Shoot the pig (I’m throwing in this obvious first step just because I can!)
  2. Hang the pig to drain the blood.
  3. Gut the pig.
  4. Remove the lower legs at the knees.
  5. Decide if you want the skin and the head on. (Penned pigs are not the cleanest animals so the thought of leaving the skin on grosses me out a little.)
  6. We decided to remove the skin and head.
  7. Let the pig hang for a few hours. (Meat needs to hang for a while to be safe to eat. We put bags of ice into the cavity of the pig to help it cool and wrapped it in a sheet to keep the meat clean.)
  8. While the meat is hanging collect herbs, spices, and juices you want to use on the pig.
barbecue bbq beef brown

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I was at work for the first 6 steps and Grandma Linda watched the kids. My Dad, Darin, came out to help Trenton which was great because we had never done anything like it before. Dad has been handling various livestock for my whole life so he has 30+ years of experience in processing different animals. To give an example of the amount of time it takes to prep a pig for slow roasting he came out to the house at 3ish and we got the pig on the roaster at about 9:30. When the kids and I got home Lucian was fascinated to find a pig carcass hanging from the skid steer and had a million questions for his papa.

The hanging weight of our pig was 150 Ibs which we soon discovered was too big for the roaster we borrowed. We removed the hams and Dad took home. If we decide to cook another pig it will be smaller.

After the pig hung for a few hours it was time to heat up the roaster and spice the pig. We spiced the pig by:

  • Applying a rub of brown sugar and various spices
  • Slicing holes in the meat and inserting pickled garlic cloves and onions.
  • Placing onions, apples, and garlic in the center of the pig.
  • Filling the dripping pans with apple juice to sweeten the meat and add extra flavor.

Trenton stayed up all night watching the pig and adding charcoal every hour or so. Halfway through the night he flipped it somehow. Penelope and I were sleeping so I haven’t a clue how he managed it. He woke me up at about 5 and I took over so he could sleep for a couple hours before we had to go to the church. Penelope woke up shortly after so she was outside with me in the stroller. We divided our time between getting morning chores done and checking on the pig. At about 8:30 it temped out so we let it pitter out while we were in church.

It was amazingly delicious and quiet a few family members snitched meat before it even made it into the roaster pans. I know I had my fair share before lunch started. My thoughtful sisters provided gallon sized bags for people to take pork home and we still had almost a full roaster full afterward for ourselves.

Overall, I think it went well and it was definitely a learning experience that we may repeat with a smaller pig.

Fresh Goat Cheese

Fresh goat cheese adds flavor to many recipes that would not be the same without it. The main problem is that fresh goat cheese is expensive and how fresh is it really?

Making fresh goat cheese is a great way to use your goat milk and to turn your raw milk into a great product. I thought I would share my recipe for fresh goat cheese.

This recipe needs to be started at night because the cheese making process is a long one.

  1. Heat 1 gallon of fresh goat milk to 70 degreeskimg0410
  2. Dissolve 1/4 tablet WalcoRen in 1 cup water
  3. Add 1 1/2 cups yo-goat. (See Yo-Goat post)
  4. Stir well
  5. Add rennet/water mixture to warmed milk
  6. Stir until curds form
  7. Place in an insulated box for 12 hours

I usually make cheese at night after Lucian and Fiona go to sleep. Penelope has been my helper the last few times I have made cheese but since she is 6 months old now and starting to grab at things it is a little hazardous holding her while stirring. Soon she will be banished to her bouncy seat when stirring is necessary.

In the morning:

  1. Use a cheese clothe or butter muslin to drain whey from curd.

    bread with cream on top

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  2. Hang curd in cheese clothe for 4-6 hours.
  3. Form into molds. I use muffin tins double lined with paper cups.
  4. Turn every hour or so.
  5. After 2-4 hours cheese is ready.

I like to sprinkle a little cheese on a salad or pizza. There are many uses for goat cheese and finding what works best for your taste buds is the fun part!

Meet Melody

We bought our hobby farm in May of 2013 and brought my horse, Jack, home to it in July of that year after we had fences up. Since that time he has been the only horse on the property. He gets a little company from the goats but honestly he ignores their presence and barely tolerates them most days. He can be a bit grouchy and not just because he is now 22. He has always been a bit cranky and set in his ways. I do believe stubbornness is an Appaloosa trait.

We finally decided it was time for Jack to have company. For the last year we have been keeping our ears and eyes open for a good fit for our hobby farm and last week we finally found one.

Her name is Melody and she is a 15 year old Haflinger. MelodyWe picked her up from Bridget the neighbor girl who has done chores for us while we were on vacation. She is going to be going to college this week and of the kids in her family she was the only one interested in keeping the horses. So her family made the decision to rehome their three horses. Of the three Melody was the healthiest and the most rideable.

It may sound a little hard-hearted of me but even if all the horses were free I really only wanted the one that I could ride and that wouldn’t need a large vet bill to maintain. I honestly cannot afford an animal I can’t use in some way. Many people believe horses are just hay burners but I enjoy going out on long rides with Jack so he is worth every penny I spend on hay. We picked her up Wednesday evening and started introducing her to Jack.

A few things to keep in mind when introducing a new animal:

  1. First, keep the new animal in a separate pen so they can see, hear, and smell each other without being able to touch. This allows the animals to become accustomed to the sight, sound, and scent of the other animal without fighting.
  2. Secondly, they are going to fight. Even after letting the animals become accustomed to each other from afar they will fight when put together. There is no getting around this fact. Dominance needs to be established, personalities need to be discovered, and boundaries need to be set but if they are put together right away they will fight more than if they become accustomed to each other from a distance.
  3. Lastly, remember that new animals do not know where the fences are so it is a good idea to walk them around the perimeter or remark the fence lines with fencing tape so the wires are clearly visible.

I have been present for horse introductions many times and I will say that introducing Melody to Jack was very easy. They didn’t fight very much and they seemed interested in each other in a good way and were willing to make friends. On Jack’s side of things Melody is a girl so of course he wants to be friends.

Melody is a Haflinger which is a smaller horse but not quite classified as a pony. She is small and stocky with big feet but because of her size she is not suitable for Trenton to ride. We decided when we were still thinking of getting her that she would be a family kid’s horse which means all the kids are welcome to be part of riding her, feeding her, and generally taking care of her if they wish to enjoy going out for rides. My niece, Aurora, is super excited about it and Fiona wants to ride her so bad. I have not gotten a chance to take her out yet to see how she does so the kids are not allowed on her until then. We did tie both horses to the hitching post to brush them, clean feet, and fit Melody to a saddle. She did well considering we had extra kids around that day so the session also worked to desensitizing Melody to having kids run around. Jack looked as if he could fall asleep while Melody watched everything intently but kept herself calm.

I think it will work nicely having another horse to keep Jack company and for the kids to ride out with me. The only reservation I have is that it may be difficult to ride out with only one horse. I believe the other will throw a fit, well, Jack will anyway. He is a notorious fit thrower.

 

Yo-Goat

Having a new baby takes up a lot of time and energy so this year I am raising a zkidsbaby rather than working on projects. Helping Penelope grow is more important but still I look around at what I usually work on this time of year and sigh a little. While the weeds take over, Jack idles in his pasture, and products are not being made Penelope is rolling over, figuring out how to put things in her mouth, and laughing at her siblings. They are only little once so I enjoy it while I can and turn a blind eye on the toys taking over our house, never-ending laundry, and reappearing dishes.

That being said I do plan on making a few batches of goat cheese before the pigs are no longer hear to enjoy the waste byproduct of cheese making which is whey. Basically there are four ingredients needed to make cheese:

  1. Milk
  2. Rennet (My new rennet arrived in the mail this week!)
  3. Starter culture or buttermilk
  4. Water

Before I can make the cheese I need to make the buttermilk. I have discovered that I can make goat milk yogurt which works great as a cheese making starter. When my friend Jessica was living with us she liked to try new recipes and one that she tried was goat milk yogurt which she cleverly titled yo-goat. Unfortunately goat milk yogurt is an acquired taste which we were never able to acquire. While we were experimenting with goat milk we decided to use the yo-goat instead of buttermilk to make cheese. It worked great, so I have been using it ever since. Jessica gifted me her yogurt maker and I use the recipe in the booklet to make it.

Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker Abbreviated Directions:

  1. Pour 7 glass jars (equal to 42oz) of fresh, pasteurized milk into saucepan.
  2. Heat milk until it boils (203 degrees) and starts to climb the sides of the saucepan. Boiling ensures a firmer yogurt familiar to most American tastes.
  3. Remove from heat and allow milk to cool to room temp. (68 degrees)
  4. Pour cooled milk through a fine mesh colander.
  5. Stir in one glass jar (6oz) of natural yogurt with some of the strained milk in a separate bowl until yogurt is dissolved and you have a smooth mixture.
  6. Mix the room temp. milk very well with the smooth mixture.
  7. Pour mixture into the 7 jars .
  8. Place the jars- without the lids– in the yogurt maker.
  9. Cover yogurt maker with clear lid.
  10. It takes about 6 hrs. to make yogurt with whole milk, and 8 hrs. for skimmed milk.

    zjars

    If you are wondering why one jar is smaller it is because we lost a jar and replaced it with a baby food jar. 

As I have relaid in previous posts I do not follow recipes very well so I have my own version of this recipe. Remember I only use yo-goat as an ingredient to make cheese. If I were going to make yogurt for myself to eat I would follow the recipe a bit better.

Yo-goat Recipe:

  1. Pour 1 quart of fresh goat milk into saucepan.
  2. Heat milk to about room temperature.
  3. Add about 6oz plain yogurt and whisk until yogurt is dissolved into milk.
  4. Pour into the 7 jars
  5. Place jars- without lids – in the yogurt maker.
  6. Cover the yogurt maker with the clear lid.
  7. Let the yogurt maker run for about 6-8 hours until yogurt is ready.

As you may have noticed I have a few less steps to my recipe than the booklet recommends.

  • I did not boil the milk because I want all the wonderful cheese making bacteria alive and well.
  • I skipped a few steps to save on dishes. I hate washing dishes so if I can complete a project only using a pot and a whisk I will do so.
  • I cut out a few steps that were only necessary to improve the texture of the finished yogurt. Again it will be an ingredient in a big pot of milk so texture issues are void.

Step 1 in cheese making completed! Now all I have to do is keep milking Fauna, the goat, until I have a gallon of fresh milk to make cheese.

I want to add a quick note on what my two older kids worked on all afternoon yesterday while I made yo-goat. Lucian built a fox trap and they spent a few hours trying to catch the fox that has been taking off with our chickens. I would guess the fox has snatched 8 chickens and all 4 of our ducks. Yesterday Lucian made a noose snare with a piece of baling twine and a blind under a tarp to watch his trap. He didn’t catch a fox but he caught himself and Fiona a few times. They had a ton of fun hiding under the tarp waiting for the fox and planning how to catch him. They even put out food and water next to the loop to lure him in. Although they didn’t get the fox the fox didn’t get any chickens because the kids set up right next to the chicken coop.

Hay Making Time

Who wants to think of winter while we are in the middle of summer?

No one, but the fact remains that winter will come and I live in Wisconsin which means winter lasts for 6 months! I have to feed hay out to the animals for an additional month after that until the grass has grown enough to support them.  That is 7 months worth of hay!

Over the years I have calculated exactly how much hay I need to make it through the winter months.

  •  30 days in a month X 7 months of winter = 210 days of feeding hay.
  • 1 horse and 3 goats will eat about 1 small square bale of hay a day.
  • I need 210 small square bales to feed out through the winter.
  • An additional horse will add 105 bales to my usual amount.(Yes, there is an additional horse in our future)
  • I need 315 small square bales for this winter.

An additional horse means more hay. Horses are big animals and it can be a bit of a hassle to haul small squares out to them every day. Round bales are more convenient because one bale will last them two weeks or more, but if you do not have a feeder to hold the bale a lot of hay will be wasted. This summer a horse round bale feeder was given to us, Yay! Trenton did a little welding on it and it is now ready to go.

Here are a few more figures:

  • 1 square bale = about 50 Ibs
  • 1 round bale = about 800 to 1000 Ibs
  • 16 to 20 square bales per round bale

My dad has been baling hay and so far we have brought two wagon loads of hay home. We have approximately 155 bales put up so far. Halfway there only 160 left to go! Or (hopefully) a few round bales. Lucian Hay 19

Lucian gets very excited when it is time to do hay. He loves the whole process and would ride around in the tractor with papa all day if he could. My dad took Lucian with him to bale the last wagon we brought home and he maniacally giggled each time a bale kicked out. His job this year when it was time to unload the wagon was to stand at the top of the elevator that runs the bales up into the hay mow and push them over when they reached the top. For some unexplained reason bales sometimes stick at the top and the twine holding the bale together breaks. He was a big help making sure the bales didn’t get stuck while I was stacking hay.

Fiona was also a big help when it was time to get the loose hay off the wagon. My dad uses a kicker baler which is nice because you don’t have to stack the hay on the wagon but is also bad because sometimes bales break when they are kicked out. There is usually a fair amount of loose hay left over on the wagon when we are done unloading the intact bales. We haul that hay into an empty stall in the barn and feed it out first. Fiona did her part in helping this year by grabbing handfuls of hay and bring them into the barn.

Grandma Linda has also been a great big help watching Fiona and Penelope while we unload hay. Fiona is 2 and not quite Kids hay 19big enough to be up in the hay mow yet. She would want to help which is great but she would also probably get wacked with a bale of hay in the process, which is not good. Penelope is 5 months old and needs a person’s full attention, so Grandma “da” came over to watch us work and visit with the wee little gremlins.